Books

Book Punch Reviews

People and place are as tied together as any two things can be. If you doubt that, drive across the country. Observe region and language and food. Better yet, go to an entirely different nation. Places make people. Places make different shades, different sounds and tastes and manners. And then, of course, places mingle. People move. New versions of words are made: new recipes become familiar. These poems are bold in how well they mingle. They’re hilarious and angry. What is poetry without anger? Not much. Read these out loud: amp them up–try the voices on. Somehow these poems trace it all back: a whole history of heat and laughter. Back so far that it’s all connected. At the end, it seems vitally important that we do know why we eat the things we eat; why we sound the way we do. Why we blame and take issue with certain things. This is deeply human–it allows for emotion and the mantras that keep us alive: that keep us tied to where we’re from. These poems are stories of people who have endured a decent amount of uneasiness. Meet them: be with them. See that we are not being judged, / for this carnal dance. 

-Micah Ling in Poetry on January 2, 2012 at 5:34 pm

In The Recital, Ricardo Nazarioy Colo crafts a bildungsroman revolving around young Orfeo set against a backdrop of rural Puerto Rico. In these deftly rendered poems, Nazario y Colon endears us to his well-intentioned hero but does not flinch from the at-times uncomfortable circumstances Orfeito finds himself in, from questions of racial identity to matters of the heart. Reading as raw as an exposed nerve, Nazario y Colon's voice remains as unadorned and tender as the first fruit of spring, rife with both tart and sweet notes.

-Bianca Spriggs, author of Kaffir Lily and Caall Her by Her Name

Daniel Cross Turner and William Wright's anthology Hard Lines: Rough South Poetry centers on the darker side of Southern experience while presenting a remarkable array of poets from diverse backgrounds in the American South. As tough-minded as they are high-minded, the sixty contemporary poets and two hundred poems anthologized in Hard Lines enhance the powerful genre of "Grit Lit." 

UPCOMING 2017

I am excited about my next work in progress. this collection of poems will be titled "The Moor of the Bronx."  Poems in this collection are center on certain experiences of my childhood and how I reconnect with that experience.

Since 1991, the Affrilachian Poets have been writing together, defying the persistent stereotype of a racially homogenized rural Appalachian region. 

Through their writing and the very existence of their enclave, the Affrilachian Poets continue to reveal relationships that link identity to familial roots, socio-economic stratification and cultural influence, and an inherent connection to the land. 

  • w-facebook
  • Twitter Clean
  • w-youtube

© 2016 by Affrilachian Poets Proudly created with Wix.com

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now